TDISH: The Fair Maid of Kent

On September 29, 1328, a daughter, Joan, was born to the Earl of Kent in Oxfordshire, England.  She would grow up to have an incredibly interesting life – especially if you consider the stereotypes that surround medieval women.  As a young girl, Joan befriended her cousin, the royal Prince Edward of Woodstock, also known as the Black Prince.  This friendship will come back into play soon!  At the age of 12, Joan secretly married disgraced nobleman, Thomas Holland, who was fourteen years her senior.  Holland then left England for Crusade against the pagans of Prussia and Joan was forced to marry William Montacute, heir of the Earl of Salisbury.  Joan did not bring up the fact that she was already married, fearful that Thomas would be killed because of it.  As such, there would be an issue when Thomas Holland returned home.

When he did, the marriage with Joan was made known and Thomas demanded the return of his wife.  William Montacute responded by imprisoning Joan in his home until the Pope finally ruled in favor of Joan’s first marriage and she returned to the house she preferred.  Over the next 11 years, Thomas and Joan celebrated the births of five children prior to Thomas’ death in 1360.  Throughout her marriage(s), Joan had maintained a close friendship with Prince Edward who had never married.  After the mourning period for Thomas was over, Edward approached Joan and gifted her a silver cup from his military exploits.  King Edward III, the Prince’s father, was concerned about his son’s courtship of a widow who had already been secretly married – but Joan and the Prince approached the king and told him that they would be married in secret, if the king did not bless the marriage.  Faced with this ultimatum from his heir, Edward III relented.  Joan of Kent and Edward, the Black Prince, were married on 10 October 1361.  Joan took the title Princess of Wales, as her new husband was the Prince of Wales (the first time this was used for the heir to the throne!). This marriage lasted for 10 years until the death of Edward and produced two children, one of whom survived to adulthood to become King Richard II upon the death of his grandfather, Edward III.

Richard_II_King_of_England.jpgWhen Edward III passed away in 1377, young Richard became king at the age of 10.  Despite mismanagement of much royal power by the subsequent regency led by Richard’s uncle, John of Gaunt, Joan brilliantly managed her own reputation and that of her son.  For example, during the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381, Joan passed through the lines of the rebels unmolested and, in fact, was cheered as she went by.  Due to her popularity, which rubbed off on her young son, the rebels never condemned the monarchy – just the bad advisors.  A strong argument, therefore, can be made that Joan of Kent held much of the responsibility for the continued success of the English monarchy during a period of particularly acute trouble.  The beloved queen mother died in 1385 and was buried, per her request, with her first husband, Thomas.

Featured Image: “Joan of Kent.”English Monarchs.
Image 1. “Richard II.” By English: Anonymous – http://www.archist.com.au/assets/images/Richard_II.jpg, Public Domain.
Source: “Joan, ‘Fair Maid of Kent’.” English Monarchs.
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TDISH: An Empress Takes the Throne

On September 27, 1916, Emperor Iyasu V of Ethiopia was deposed by a palace coup.  His advisors were concerned about Iyasu’s close ties to the Empire’s Muslim minority. In his place, his aunt, Zewditu, took the throne.  She was the first internationally recognized African female head of state.  She modeled her reign after that of Queen Victoria and intended to use her new-found powers to help strengthen the Christian Church in Ethiopia.  Zewditu’s cousin,Tafari Mekonnen (the future Haile selassie_on_time_magazine_cover_1930Selassie) was named Prime Minister.    Mekonnen was a reformer, but Zewditu was quite conservative, worried about giving up too much of the monarchy’s power.  The Prime Minister, however, pushed through reforms such as outlawing slavery and joining the League of Nations.  The Empress focused much of her time to strengthening the Ethiopian Orthodox Church that had been so instrumental in her elevation to the throne.  In 1930, Zewditu’s husband led a revolt against the modernizing Mekonnen in the hopes of consolidating power in the person of the Empress.  Unfortunately, for the ruling family, Zewditu’s husband was defeated and killed at the Battle of Anchem against Mekonnen on March 31, 1930.  Zewditu died under mysterious circumstances two days later as Mekonnen took the throne to rule until 1974 as Haile Selassie I.

Featured Image: “Empress Zewditu.” Public Domain.
Image 1: “Haile Selassie I in November 1930.” By Cover credit: International – http://www.time.com/time/covers/0,16641,1101301103,00.html, Public Domain.
Source: Tesfu, Julianna. “Empress Zewditu (1876-1930).” BlackPast.org.

TDISH: Why’d He Do It?

On September 10, 2003, Anna Lindh, the foreign minister of Sweden, was stabbed multiple times as she was shopping in a Stockholm department store.  Lindh, who was 46, was one of Sweden’s most promising politicians and was considered likely to become the next Prime Minister (a first for women).  At first, her assailant escaped the busy store, but he was captured several days later.  The assassin was Mijailo Mijailovic, a Swede of Serbian descent.  Upon his arrest and after his subsequent trail, Mijailovic was silent about his motive for the crime.  It has come to light since then that he was possibly on a hypnotic drug, Flunitrazepam, at the time of the attack and that he was just attacking the first person he recognized as a politician.  Other theories involve Lindh’s support for Sweden’s adoption of the Euro, for which she was scheduled to give a speech the day following the attack.  Unless the killer comes fully clean, we may never know why he killed Anna Lindh.

Featured Image: “Anna Lindh.” By Vesa Lindqvist/Matti Hurme – Norden.org, CC BY 2.5 dk.
Sources: “Swedish minister dies after stabbing.” BBC News. 11 September 2003.
Anna Lindh killer breaks silence over murder.” The Local. 28 August 2011.

HSF: A King, A Priest, and A Countess Walk Into A Castle

In the dead of winter, Pope Gregory VII was far from the comforts of his palace in Rome.  In Gregory_VIIfact, he was high in the Apennine Mountains in Northern Italy on his way to Augsburg, Bavaria to attend a gathering of dignitaries of the Church meant to solve a dispute with the King of Germany and Holy Roman Emperor, Henry IV.  Gregory and his entourage stopped to recover from their arduous journey thus far at the Castle of Canossa.  This fortress was one of the strongest mountain keeps held by Countess Matilda of Tuscany, nominal vassal of Henry and ally of Gregory in the ongoing dispute.  But we are getting a bit ahead of ourselves.  Who are these people and what is this dispute?  Let’s go to know each of them a little better.

Pope Gregory VII was born Hildebrand of Sovana who became a monk in medieval Tuscany.  As his career progressed, Hildebrand rose quickly through the ranks of the Church and soon played a key role in the election of Pope Alexander II.  Hildebrand and Pope Alexander were both members of a movement meant to reform the Church, looking to get rid of practices such as clerical marriage and simony, which is the purchase of religious office.  Upon Alexander’s death, as the people and clergy of Rome gathered at the St. John Lateran Basilica to mourn their leader, a great cry went up, “Let Hildebrand be Pope!” even though he had not yet even been ordained a priest, let alone a bishop.  The Church leaders in Rome recognized in Hildebrand an incredibly popular figure and recognized the people’s proclamation – making Gregory VII one of seven Popes elected by acclamation (out of 266 recognized Popes in history).  In the weeks before he donned the papal tiara, Gregory was ordained as a priest and elevated to the bishopric.  His zeal for Church reform was only just beginning and now he had the power to really do something!

Henry IV was the third member of his family to become King of Germany and Holy Roman Emperor, after his grandfather, Conrad II, and his father, Henry III.  His family had traditional been the Dukes of Franconia – a region of modern Germany just north of Bavaria.  Henry’s Heinrich_4_g.jpgfather died when he was young boy just shy of six years old.  As such, he was raised to the title of Holy Roman Emperor at a very tender age.  Now, the Holy Roman Emperor was certainly a significant power, but the authority was not at all absolute.  As soon as he was old enough to assert personal power, Henry IV made it his life’s goal to consolidate the power of his position and his family.  The German provinces were a loose confederation of duchies, counties, princedoms, baronies, etc. held together primarily by religion – the “holy” of the Holy Roman Empire.  Much of the Holy Roman Emperor’s power came from the influence he held over the bishops of his territory and Henry only wanted to extend that influence!

Matilda of Tuscany was the youngest of three children of the powerful House of Canossa who ruled much of what is now Northern Italy as vassals of the Holy Roman Emperor.  Upon the death of her father and two older siblings, Matilda became the last member of her family and, as such, her husband, Godfrey the Hunchback, Duke of Lorraine also became the Margrave of Tuscany.  Matilda and Godfrey’s marriage was a rocky one.  Their only child died in infancy and Godfrey spent most of his time in Lorraine (in northern Germany) while Matilda was home in Italy.  Godfrey was assassinated while on campaign against the Duke of Saxony on behalf of his liege, Henry IV in one of the most embarrassing ways possible.  He was run through while “answering the call of nature.”  This left Matilda the last remaining option to rule over Northern Italy and she did so brilliantly, becoming La Gran Contessa – the Great Countess. Now a power in her own right, Matilda declared her support, not for Henry, but rather for Pope Gregory, whose reforms struck a chord with the Countess.  The stage was now set for one of the great conflicts of the early Middle Ages.

Reggio_Emilia_posizione.pngAmong Gregory’s first actions once elevated to the papacy was to confirm his predecessor’s edict banning a widespread practice called “lay investiture.”  Now, I know that at this point your eyes are probably rolling into the back of your head if you’ve ever heard this term before.  It is up there with eye-glazing topics from history such as paradigm shifts and tariffs, but trust me – some people get really excited about these boring concepts and do ridiculous things to support their positions and that is what we have going on here.  Lay investiture is the practice in which officials in the Catholic Church were given their position (“invested”) by the ruler of the state in which their diocese was located.  While, theoretically, this could be done for any Church official from the lowly parish priest to the most influential bishop, European rulers tended to only focus their time investing men (and it was always men) into the most powerful positions – bishops of important towns and cities, abbots of wealthy monasteries, etc.  By filling these positions with men the king or local lord could trust, they ensured the cooperation of the vast majority of Christian leadership within their domain, since all lower members of the clergy reported to this appointee.  It’s not a big stretch to see what the Pope, supposedly the head of the Catholic religion across all political lines, would find this to be problematic, a challenge to his authority.

Gregory’s confirmation and enforcement of the ban of lay investiture infuriated the Holy Roman Emperor, Henry IV, who relied on the loyalty of his bishops to run his empire.  Things came to a head when Gregory sent Henry a letter protesting the Emperor’s attempt to influence the installation of a new bishop for the ever-influential city of Milan.  The Pope meant to remind Henry that, even though he was an emperor, he was still subject to papal decrees.  Henry, of course, disagreed.  Gregory wrote, “We marvel exceedingly that you have sent us so many devoted letters…calling yourself a son of our Holy Mother Church and subject to us in faith…and yet in action showing yourself most bitterly hostile to the canons and apostolic decrees in those duties…It would have been becoming to you, since you confess yourself to be a son of the Church, to give more respectful attention to the master of the Church, that is, to Peter, the prince of the Apostles.”  If Henry had been cowed by such a letter, this would not be much of a story, and his response struck right at the issue in the salutation in which he said, “Henry, king not by usurpation, but by the pious ordination of God, to Hildebrand, now not Pope, but false monk.”  The Emperor clearly states that he does not recognize Gregory’s papacy – in face he even refused to use the Pope’s papal name.  Henry argues that, due to Gregory’s unusual election, the Pope is not legitimate and that, therefore, his word carries no weight.

As you can probably imagine, this was not the response Gregory was looking for – so he sent yet another letter to Henry declaring him excommunicated and unfit to receive the Sacraments, which, removed him from the grace of the Church that was integral to salvation.  Simultaneously, Gregory called on all good Christians in Henry’s realm to seek to depose such an evil ruler.  Henry’s response only escalated the tension further writing to the German bishops urging them to use their influence to unseat “Hildebrand (a monk indeed in habit), so-called pope who…presides in the Apostolic See not with the care of a pastor but with the violence of a usurper and from the throne of peace dissolves the bond of the one catholic peace.”  So to summarize, we now have, after a fury of ever escalating letters, the most powerful Church leader and the most powerful temporal leader in Europe having deposed one another.  The stage was now set to see who would blink first.

As the year progressed, Henry IV began to feel more and more pressure from his nobles and bishops to give in to the Pope for the sake of his realm.  His subjects were being born 800px-Canossa_ruins.jpgunbaptized and dying without Last Rites.  The Emperor’s intransigence was consigning his people to Hell.  So Henry sent off yet another letter (the last one for this story, I promise!) inviting the pontiff to a council in the city of Augsburg over which Gregory would preside and the bishops of Germany would decide the conditions of the Emperor’s surrender.  The Pope accepted this offer with glee and set off for the Bavarian city from Rome.  It is on this journey that we started our story.  Pope Gregory is staying for a short time in a fortress of one of his most faithful supporters, Matilda of Tuscany.  It was here at the Canossa Castle deep in the Apennine winter that a fateful, and unplanned (for Gregory, at least) showdown occurred.

Henry slipped away from his realms with a very small group of loyal retainers and made his way across the snow-covered Alps to make his way to Canossa.  He hoped to see Gregory and to throw himself upon the Pope’s mercy in the hopes of getting a better outcome at the coming council.  It was a classic move of negotiating before the official negotiations so as to have more control over the results.  Gregory, however, was not going to make it easy on the Henry.

Canossa-gate.jpgOn January 25, Henry and his attendants arrived at the gates of Canossa Castle in the midst of a raging alpine blizzard.  They were shoeless and dressed in the clothes of a penitent, wearing a hair-shirt as a sign of their unworthiness.  Pope Gregory learned of their arrival immediately, comfortably ensconced in the Castle and was put into a quite awkward diplomatic situation.  He was clearly in a position of power and had his adversary in a very weak spot.  He could have sent Henry packing back to Germany with a reminder that they already had an agreement to determine his fate at the coming council.  However, Gregory was not just a world leader; he was also the lead pastor of Christendom and one of his charges had taken on the guise of a penitent and was asked forgiveness.  As Christ’s representative on Earth, Gregory had more than politics to consider; he also had souls to worry about.

Gregory was not going to bend quickly to this unexpectedly humble move from Henry.  For Hugo-v-cluny_heinrich-iv_mathilde-v-tuszien_cod-vat-lat-4922_1115ad.jpgthree long days, the pontiff pondered what to do, regularly conferring with his ally, Matilda, who had no love for her nominal overlord, Henry.  As the Pope, Countess, and their attendants sat debating in front of the roaring fireplaces and feasted in Canossa, Henry and his few men stayed knelt in prayer in the driving snow wearing only their wretchedly uncomfortable hair shirts and without shoes.  For three days and nights, they fasted and unmistakable sign of their penitence.  After the three days had passed, Gregory sensibilities as a spiritual leader and shepherd of souls overcame his political nature – Henry was granted entrance to Canossa.  Upon entering the fortress, he was treated to full diplomatic niceties – dressed in fine clothing, fed well, and warmed by the welcoming fires.  After a series of discussion between Gregory and Henry, in which Henry pronounced his deepest regrets for undermining papal authority, the two men, along with their hostess, celebrated Mass and received Communion – lifting Henry’s excommunication and that of the entire Holy Roman Empire.  Gregory, however, refrained from lifting Henry’s deposition.  In the eyes of the Church, Henry was no longer damned, but neither was he an emperor.

However, in doing his duty and bringing Henry back into the Christian fold, Gregory encountered some unintended consequences.  By lifting the excommunication, Gregory removed the largest (and in most cases the only) issue the nobility of the Holy Roman Empire had with Henry.  They returned to him in droves, professing their loyalty and only asking that he be careful not to risk their souls again in unnecessary conflict with the Holy See.  One of Henry’s most powerful nobles, however, used the opportunity to declare that he was seeking the throne and, in so doing, sparked civil war within the Empire.  This man, Rudolf of Rheinfelden, was the Duke of Swabia and brother-in-law to the Holy Roman Emperor – both men being married to sisters from the House of Savoy.  Rudolf used his influence throughout Germany and a history of dissatisfaction with Henry’s rule in Saxony to launch a rebellion against his erstwhile lord.  As the war dragged on, Gregory decided to once again enter the fray and, siding with the rebel Rudolf, excommunicated Henry yet again, expecting similar results.  This time, however, the nobility loyal to Henry were not prepared to abandon their king.  Henry was their legitimate ruler and this excommunication due to fighting a rebellious vassal smacked of insincere politics, not religious necessity.  Gregory’s excommunication was viewed as invalid across Germany.

Once Henry had dealt with Rudolf and the troubles at home, he once again turned on the Pope, but this time, from a position of much greater power.  Henry marched on Rome.  Matilda of 800px-Chateau-saint-ange-tibre.jpgTuscany stayed loyal to Pope and, despite being massively outnumbered, her troops harried Henry’s forces as he marched south.  But despite Matilda’s attempts, Henry reached Rome and took the Lateran Palace, Gregory’s official residence.  The Pope was forced to make an ignoble retreat to the Castel Sant’Angelo on the shores of the Tiber.  Now in almost full control of Rome, Henry IV called a council of bishops who were loyal to him and had them name a new pope – Clement III.  So, now, we had two popes.  The ever-devout Matilda continued to work for Gregory and succeeded in finding him allies among the Normans, a large force of whom made their way to the first city of Christendom and forced Henry to withdraw back to Germany.

So, it seems like Gregory won, despite numerous setbacks, however, one final twist remained.  The ever-fickle people of Rome despised the Pope’s Norman allies and forced them to leave the city and, at the same time, exiled Gregory – who fled to the monastery at Monte Casino, south of Rome.  It was here that Gregory died less than a year later.  On his deathbed, Gregory withdrew all excommunications he had ever made – except those upon Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor and his puppet pope, Clement III.

Featured Image: “Countryside Outside of Canossa.” By Hm8011 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0.
Image 1. “Pope Saint Gregory VII.” By user:GDK – Own work: unknown 11th century manuscript, Public Domain.
Image 2. “Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV.” Public Domain.
Image 3. “Location of Canossa Within Modern Italy.” CC BY-SA 3.0.
Image 4. “Ruins of Canossa Castle.” By Paolo da Reggio – Own work, CC BY 2.5.
Image 5. “Henry IV at the Gates of Canossa Castle.” Public Domain.
Image 6. “Matilda of Tuscany and Henry IV.” Public Domain.
Image 7. “Modern Picture of Castel Sant’Angelo.” By 0x010C – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0.
Sources:
Morrison, Karl F, ed. The Investiture Controversy: Issues, Ideals, and Results. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1971
Tierney, Brian. The Crisis of Chruch & State: 1050 – 1300. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1964.
Wood, Susan. The Proprietary Church  In the Medieval West. Oxford University Press, 2006.

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“A King, A Priest, and A Countess Walk Into A Castle.” by Andy Smyser is licensed under CC By 4.0. https://historyisstrange.com/2016/07/22/hsf-a-king-a-priest-and-a-countess-walk-into-a-castle.

TDISH: A Founding Father Overthrown

On the morning of August 15, 1975, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the President of Bangladesh, and much of his family were assassinated by members of the military in a bloody coup.  Rahman had been a leading figure in Bangladeshi independence from Pakistan in in 1971.  He became the new country’s first President and then became Prime Minister in 1972 before becoming President again in early 1975.  Rahman’s death a few months into his second term as President plunged Bangladesh into years of political chaos from which the country is only just emerging, slowly.

On the morning of the assassinations, only two of Rahman’s children escaped death – two of Sheikh_Hasina_in_London_2011his daughters were abroad in West Germany at the time.  Both were banned from ever returning to their homeland.  Yet, return they did.  In fact, in 1996 one of Rahman’s daughters Sheik Hasina Wazed was elected Prime Minister.  One of her first acts was to pursue legal action against those military officers who led the coup.  Due to political wrangling, she was out of office before any real progress was made.  In 2009, she was re-elected Prime Minister and remains so today.  She was since reconvened the legal actions and in 2010 five of the officers were executed after being found guilty.  Six other officers have been convicted, but their death sentences have not been carried out since they have not returned to Bangladesh since Wazed came to power and were convicted in absentia.

August 15 continues to be marked as a National Day of Mourning in Bangladesh in Sheik Rahman’s honor.

Featured Image: “Sheikh Mujibur Rahman.” By Source (WP:NFCC#4), Fair use.
Image 1. “Sheik Hasina Wazed.” By Prime Minister’s Office – Derivative (Cropped by Ctg4Rahat), OGL.
Sources: Ahmed, Anis. “Killers of Bangladesh independence leader executed.” Reuters. 27 January 2010.

 

 

TDISH: The Lioness of Brittany

On August 2, 1343, early on in the Hundred Years’ War between France and England, Breton knight, Olivier De Clisson, was executed under orders of King Philip VI of France for treason.  Olivier was accused of aiding and abetting the English enemy, but the evidence was never made public prompting rumors of the lord’s execution was politically motivated.  These events led Olivier’s wife, Jeanne De Belleville, took their two sons and her deceased husband’s fleet of ships and set out to teach the King of France a lesson.  She hired a crew of sailors and went Exécution_d'Olivier_IV_de_Clisson_(1343)about roving the English Channel in the search of French targets – the Lady had turned pirate!  One of the most daring raids attributing to the so-called Lioness of Brittany was a raid on the Chateau Thébaut in the Loire River Valley, where she wiped out the entire French garrison.  She also reputedly captured a French ship sailing on the English Channel and, finding a French nobleman loyal to the King aboard, decapitated him by her own hand, thus she had her revenge for her (purportedly) wrongly executed husband.

While much of the story of Jeanne De Belleville is legend, the records do support that she led a short period of revolt against the French King, though many of the exact details actually date to the French Romantic Movement on the nineteenth century.  Jeanne’s story of a strong female leader during the Hundred Years’ War is hardly unique.  In fact, the most famous one is another one we will be covering in History is Stranger of Fiction – Joan of Arc!

Source: Adams, James. “Jeanne De Belleville, Pirate or Politician?James Adams Historic Enterprises.
Featured Image: “Jeanne De Belleville: The Lioness of Brittany.”
Image 1: “Execution of Olivier De Clisson.” By Liédet, Loyset (v.1420-1479) – BNF RC-B-01633 FRANCAIS 2643, Chroniques. – Bruges Folio 126, Public Domain.

TDISH: A Peasant For Emperor

On August 1, 527, the a new Emperor and Empress came to power in the Byzantine Empire – Justinian I and Theodora.  The pair would become known for their numerous achievements despite reigning during a tumultuous period of Byzantine history.  During Justinian’s time on the throne, he oversaw the building of the great Hagia Sophia in Constantinople and the codification of laws in the Corpus Juris Civilis – that would serve as a basis for many law codes throughout subsequent history.  All of this may not sound very strange, but where our new imperial couple came from certainly is.

800px-Meister_von_San_Vitale_in_Ravenna_008.jpgJustinian was born somewhere in the Western frontiers of the Byzantine Empire (records are unclear) to poor peasant parents.  He made a name for himself as a solider and was able to come to power through the patronage of his predecessor, Justin, whom Justinian had served under in the military.  As Justin’s right-hand man, Justinian met Theodora, a mainstay of Constantinople’s high society – bur for all the wrong reasons.  She was a courtesan and, though her services were widely desired, was looked down upon by “polite society.” Justinian was immediately smitten with the lovely Theodora who, despite accusations of gold-digging, was likely equally attracted to the future emperor.  Contradictory to the long odds, on August 1, 527, a peasant and his courtesan wife ruled the greatest power in the Western World and would go on to be among the greatest rulers of its long history.

For all the great details, check out the History of Byzantium podcast!

Featured Image: “Justinian I.” By Petar Milošević – Basilica of Saint Vitalis, CC BY-SA 4.0.
Image 1: “Theodora.” By Meister von San Vitale in Ravenna – The Yorck Project: 10.000 Meisterwerke der Malerei. DVD-ROM, 2002. ISBN 3936122202. Distributed by DIRECTMEDIA Publishing GmbH., Public Domain.